5 ways to relax in Sonoma County this Summer!

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Summer. A time for being in nature. For fresh air. When our skin gets to feel the warm sun, lie in the cleansing sand. The season designated for relaxation. So what are the best ways to relax in Sonoma County this summer? Luckily for us, this beautiful part of the country offers majestic natural landscapes that make for wonderful getaways–that time in nature is so important to our physical, mental, and emotional restoration! Here are our top five ways to enjoy Osmosis during the season of abundance.

  1. Massage in the Pagodas. Take a stroll down the wooded paths to a private pagoda and enjoy the songs of nature as you treat your muscles, your skin, and your mind, to some healing kneading.
  2. Hammocks! Need we say more? Sway in the soft breeze along Salmon Creek and rock yourself into a blissful summer dream.
  3. Lunch in the forest. Taste the bounty of local Sonoma County farms while enjoying a fresh, local meal prepared by Fork Roadhouse. Get lost in the views from our eating areas tucked away among the trees.
  4. Summer Skin Care. Let one of our expert estheticians rejuvenate you face, heal sun damage, and hydrate your skin–leaving you looking and feeling your best.
  5. The gardens! Soak up some rays or relax in the shade. Let your mind wander as you watch the coy fish meander through the Heart Mind Pond. Take a deep breath. This is what summer is all about.

Monthly Meditation July 2015

This week we are sharing an audio talk given by Tara Brach titled “Beloved Community.”

From Tara’s blog:

‘Martin Luther King’s term, “Beloved Community,” points to our potential for living together with love, justice and respect. This talk explores the often hidden expressions of racism that fuel separation and violence, and pathways toward healing and freeing our collective hearts.

At the same time as the tragic killings in Charleston, SC, Tara’s Wednesday night class was reflecting on racism and the aspiration for Beloved Community. “May we awaken our hearts from the prison of separation; may we seek to end the daily violence, injustice and oppression faced by African Americans.”‘

Listen here. 

A Day at Osmosis by Treinnet Reed

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A couple is guided through the Osmosis experience with walks through the beautiful gardens and bamboo pathways along the banks of Salmon Creek in California. Witness the unique spa experience that Osmosis offers its guests. Guided through heavenly gardens to receive world class treatments in the most awe-inspiring settings.
You’ll understand why this spa has been voted Best Spa in Sonoma County for 17 years running, and why it is a beloved destination of northern California.

https://youtu.be/KM4RrIaAvq4

30-year Anniversary of Osmosis

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We are both honored and humbled to be celebrating our 30th anniversary of the Cedar Enzyme Bath.

In the three decades since we first introduced to the Cedar Enzyme Bath to the United States, over 300,000 people have enjoyed its many benefits. Thousands of guests have shared with us their experiences of healing: improved sleep, increased mobility, reduced arthritic pain, improved digestion… the list goes on and on. We foresee this therapy becoming a recognized treatment for a wide range of health issues as the scientific community continues to expand their research on the connections between enzymes, probiotics, and human health.

San Francisco Chronicle: Spa’s food in sync with its mission

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The San Francisco Chronicle wrote this piece about the unique food program and delicious offerings at Osmosis.

by Carey Sweet

The spa menu at Osmosis Day Spa Sanctuary in Freestone offers the usual massages and facials. But the Zen-inspired retreat of meditation gardens, creekside tea services and pagodas amid whispering trees offers the unexpected, too: the opportunity to ferment up to your neck in wooden tubs filled with finely ground cedar, rice bran and plant enzymes.

So it’s not surprising that the lunch menu here is no ordinary affair, either. In a novel approach to spa cuisine, food is produced in partnership with Ceres Community Project, a project from Sebastopol that trains teenage chefs to craft food as “medicine for the community.”

Specifically, Ceres provides nourishing meals to people with cancer and other life-threatening illnesses while seeking to educate the public about the connection between food, healing and wellness.

Three years ago, Osmosis owner Michael Stusser approached Ceres to cook for his luxury oasis, where clients come to indulge in the baths he discovered in Japan for soothing pain, calming nerves, detoxifying and brightening skin. The nonprofit provided some 1,000 meals a year, all cooked by its students.

Then in March, Stusser and Ceres Executive Director Cathryn Couch came up with a more efficient idea: The cooking would be taken over by Fork Roadhouse and Catering, a restaurant just opened by chef Sarah Piccolo in Sebastopol. Piccolo provides the lunches at cost to Osmosis, so the spa can continue to pass along a portion of each sale to Ceres.

“Because Ceres runs their kitchen with volunteers, they could only make up lunches for Osmosis two or three times a week,” says Stusser. “Keeping the orders consistent with our guest volume was always a guessing game, and there was waste.”

Plus, the philosophy of Osmosis, Ceres and Fork is pristine ingredients. Ceres receives daily deliveries from purveyors such as the nonprofit WHOA Farm in Santa Rosa — $14,000 worth of WHOA food last year alone, according to Couch — while Fork works with artisan producers like FEED Sonoma, a business that purchases from 50 small farms in Sonoma County and delivers micro-orders to local buyers.

“With Fork, we can order and receive lunches daily, eliminating waste,” said Stusser. “It keeps everything so fresh and still provides a very helpful weekly cash flow to Ceres.”

For spa clients, the community benefit may just be icing on the tofu. Lunch costs $20 and can be pre-ordered at booking. Menus offer a broad range of items, such as miso-glazed chicken with rice noodle-kale-arame kelp salad; coconut vegetable masala over brown rice; or tempeh with orange, ginger and lemongrass sauce over sushi rice and salad.

“It’s a natural, since Ceres is strongly aligned in our values for a core focus on health, wellness and vitality,” Stusser said. “And our guests tell us Fork is delicious.”

Carey Sweet is a Bay Area freelance writer. E-mail: food@sfchronicle.com