Posts Tagged ‘Michael Alliger’

Horticultural Garden Tour

horticultural garden tour at osmosis

A 1.5 hour-long guided tour of the Osmosis Kyoto-style Meditation garden will be conducted by Osmosis founder Michael Stusser and tree pruning expert Michael Alliger. This garden makes extensive use of stone, water and deer resistant plants to express the tranquil feeling of a Japanese style design.

Visitors will be treated to an in-depth look at the underlying Zen themes built into the rock arrangements and pond layout, as well as information about the planting themes and plant materials. The garden has been built over a period of many years and was designed by the preeminent landscape designer, Robert Ketchell, of Britain.

Tour followed by Cedar Enzyme Footbaths, tea and snacks.

Admission: $25. Book a service for that day and get $20 off any service. Space is limited to 14, make your reservations in advance.

The Art of Watering

By Michael Alliger, Master Pruner

Summer’s here in Sonoma County California and the rains have stopped.  This means it’s time to water.  Since water is increasingly precious it’s important to use it to best effect.  My pruning mentor Dennis Makishima enlivened in me the love of growing trees in containers and it was he who said, “Watering is an art”.  Those words changed me forever, remaking what might have been a mindless routine into a conscious relational act bordering on spiritual.  As I came to understand it watering is a complex, intriguing aspect of plant care.

Over-Watering

Effective watering depends on a plant’s needs, soil composition, sun and wind exposure, and temperature.  A recurring concern is how much water and how often.  Over-watering is especially problematic since we generally don’t see the effects until it’s too late with no remedy short of re-potting.  To avoid this dilemma we learn from bonsai artists to use soil mix that is virtually without organic matter consisting only of drainage material.  Most bagged potting mixes have high levels of humus, compost, etc. which retain water in such varying and unknown quantities that accurate assessment of soil moisture is difficult.  Using the high drainage formula allows excess water to drain immediately.  While eliminating the fear of over-watering this mix also means we must guard against drying out.  So a regular seasonal schedule of watering is required.  To help gauge soil moisture an inexpensive hydrometer may be available at local hardware stores or nurseries.  In the absence of a hydrometer, a quick check of water retention can be done by lifting the container (when possible) to judge weight.  A light container likely means it’s time to water.  A plant that has seriously dried out can be dunked in a bucket of water; holding the soil level below water will elicit bubbles as air spaces are filled with water.  Remove the container and water runs out to proper level. Another aspect of humus-free mix is that fertilizing is up to us.  Proper fertilizing is an art unto itself and too lengthy a discussion for the current effort.  Stay tuned.

Hose-end hand watering is best with a gently showering nozzle.  This implement avoids splash-out of soil while freshening foliage without damage.

sprayer

In-Ground Plants

Most considerations for watering containers are applicable to watering in-ground plants.  While clearly we are not responsible for overall soil conditions in our garden (e.g. loamy, clayey, sandy) amending that soil is critical.  Adding humus-y composted material is almost always a good idea.  It adds nutrients, aerates, and paradoxically improves both drainage and water retention.  Hand-watering (holding a hose in hand) is generally ineffective for getting water to the roots of all but the slightest of bedding plants.  For trees and shrubs a simple inexpensive sprinkler does the job nicely, especially when combined with a calendar and a standard household timer.  For most trees, it’s best to water infrequently and deeply:  every 3 to 4 weeks; 45 minutes; shrubs 20-30 minutes.  Native plants may require less water, but please remember that drought “tolerant” plants may actually do somewhat better with slightly more water.  Careful experimentation is the key.  Established trees and shrubs should be watered out to the drip line (foliage circumference) as this is where the feeder roots grow.  Watering at the trunk is largely ineffective.  Newly planted specimens should be watered so as to encourage roots to spread out.

Drip Irrigation

Regarding drip irrigation, there are pros and cons with both containers and in-ground gardens.  On the plus side, drip allows us to water without being present and it can be automated.  It helps sustain life, especially with initial planting.  On the other hand, while seemingly carefree drip irrigation requires regular attention.  We must examine emitters for location and potential clogging due to soil and bugs.  Tubing should be checked for leaks, disconnects and kinks.  Also, dissemination of water is limited by emitters (narrow gravity-driven trajectory) and sprayers rarely get deep enough.  In addition emitters are rated at gallons per hour and it’s unusual to see a system set for more than 15 to 20 minutes.  This might be ok for bedding plants but has little effect on trees and shrubs.  Just as we water the newly planted  increasingly toward the drip line, drip emitters must be periodically moved outward to accommodate spreading roots.

For me the biggest drawback to drip is that it separates us from actually tending to and interacting with our plants in an essential way.  Hand-watering, when done consciously, affords an opportunity to inspect our trees forinsects, disease and general well-being.  We become familiar with a healthy look and are therefore more aware of changes that indicate stress or threat.  Perhaps the most profound benefit is the intimacy it brings – a chance to say hello to each plant and to bask in the silence of its reply.

Garden Journal

japanese garden master pruner

By Michael Alliger, Master Pruner

Autumn 2017

With the softening of the light and cooling of temperatures comes a time for an out-breath in the garden. Autumn at Osmosis brings a relaxing sigh after the hurried intensity of summer. In the calm expanse of golden light, we look back to what has been: the surprises, accomplishments, and challenges; and we look ahead to the opportunities that winter rains will offer.

Here at Osmosis Day Spa Sanctuary in Sonoma County, California, Spring was enlivened by deep and late rains. Trees especially came out with a robust vigor. This was an expectation gratefully rewarded. The surprise was that this vigor did not translate into increased health throughout a very hot summer. Many trees seemed inexplicably weaker as the season progressed. Autumn, therefore, brings welcome relief for the garden as well as the gardeners.

Falling Leaves

Bamboo Falling Leaves

Bamboo’s Falling Leaves

Though plant growth has slowed, the rain of falling leaves keeps gardeners busy raking. Raking of the paths and grounds is expected but benches, lanterns, stones and the plants themselves must be kept as pristine as possible. It’s interesting to observe that broadleaf evergreen trees (such as bays), as well as conifers, are losing countless leaves at this time. Bamboo, an evergreen, is dropping leaves at a surprising rate. For good hygiene and appearance groves must be raked and mulched. Pines, redwoods, and hinokis all display an inner browning of foliage that may drop eventually with winter storms if not cleaned by garden staff.

Lack of Rain

Anticipation of winter may stir in us the realization of how long the garden has gone without rain. Lack of rain combined with extremely low atmospheric humidity makes this the driest time of the year for plants. It’s important that irrigation be regularly monitored for accurate operation and that container plants be watered assiduously sometimes being dunked in large tubs or troughs where possible. Again in anticipation of winter rains the garden is freshly mulched with nutrient rich amendment. When percolated in by rain a mulch of composted humus and manure not only enriches to plant growth but helps keep the soil alive with microbes, insects and all manner of healthful fungi.

Fall Pruning

Fall Pruning of Evergreens

Fall Pruning

Garden pruning in the fall hasn’t the pace of summer yet opportunities for care and improvement abound. In Japanese-inspired gardens like Osmosis, many trees are pruned for human scale. This reduction often stimulates a reaction growth which must be addressed. As this growth slows in summer water sprouts on plum, crabapple and persimmon, for example, can be removed or cut back. On Magnolia, heavy summer growth is also removed in preparation for early winter flowering. In addition, fruit tress such as pear, apple and apricot may be thinned and cut back. At Osmosis, we have a large naturalized apple tree growing along the bank of Salmon Creek which is pruned as an ornamental, not to interfere with a vigorous fruit production.

Evergreens are also pruned at this time. Pines are thinned, shaped and cleaned of old needles. The same can be done with various Chamaecyparis.

Nandina

Nandina

The thinning of bamboo groves not only improves appearance by removing dead, dying, and spindly culms but also can help (along with fertilizing) to increase the size of next year’s shoots for added drama. Similarly, drifts of Nandina may be thinned to display their vertical canes from which they get their common name “sacred bamboo”, though not a true bamboo.

Yes, in gardening there is the Zen moment of NOW, but we are also keeping an eye on what has been and what will be. Winter will bring an ideal opportunity for planting and transplanting. Autumn is the time to be looking ahead to the possibility of these, often dramatic, adjustments.

Learn More about pruning Nandina in the following video! Get ready to be inspired!

The Right Cut – A Master Pruner’s Journey

japanese garden master pruner

By Abby Bard

Sonoma Discoveries Magazine

Aesthetic pruning is a living art form combining the skill of the pruner, the science of horticulture, and the essence of a tree. While the emphasis is on beauty, maintaining the vitality of the tree is just as important; aesthetic pruners make the right cuts for the right reasons. For Master Pruner Michael Alliger, this art is a balance between the present and the future.

In the 1980s, Alliger was eager for change from a career in retail; he felt an inner calling to work outside. “I thought you had to be a gardener to do that,” he explained, so he enrolled in a plant identification class at Merritt College in Oakland. “I found I had a facility for it. My passion just exploded! I had never been happier.”

He had grown up in the suburbs, surrounded by lawns. “I hated mowing the lawn, so it was such a surprise to me. I found a whole new world to walk into. Suddenly the streets of Oakland came alive as I got to know the plants—the world went from two dimensions to three dimensions, from black and white to color.”

In 1986, while studying horticulture at Merritt, Alliger met Dennis Makishima, a Japanese-American student from El Cerrito. Wanting to connect with his Japanese heritage, Makishima went to bonsai clubs to learn that art, and realized that he could take elements of bonsai and apply them to landscape pruning. One day, Alliger watched Makishima prune a Japanese maple. “I was transfixed. I knew that was what I wanted to do. It felt like home. I asked if I could follow him around and watch him work.” Their relationship evolved into a formal apprenticeship.

“Dennis is brilliant,” Alliger said. “He’s a visionary, a brilliant organizer and strategist and leader.”  Makishima suggested to Merritt College that they offer classes in aesthetic pruning and asked Alliger if he would like to teach. “I taught an Introduction to Aesthetic Pruning for a half-day each month, and Dennis unfurled this whole series of classes.” The classes that Makishima organized and taught explored plant material, pruning for the focal point, pruning for the big picture, Japanese maples, pines and conifers, flowering trees, pruning as a career, and finding the essence of the tree. A year later, Makishima offered those classes to Alliger, who would teach most of them for the next 20 years.

The two men organized an informal pruning club that continues to this day at Merritt. “People could drop in or drop out any time. We would volunteer at schools, churches or parks. It was mutually beneficial. The students would get experience and the trees were cared for,” Alliger said.

Makishima also envisioned a professional organization for aesthetic pruning, similar to the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA); and he and Alliger were among the founders of the Aesthetic Pruners Association (APA), a non-profit that promotes the craft of aesthetic pruning and supports professional pruners in their work. This group sets the standards for aesthetic pruning.

Alliger explained the focus of the APA. “Our school of pruning is in the lineage of Japanese garden pruning, which is distinct from European pruning. Principles of the Japanese lineage are pruning to the human scale, size control and containment. The artistic model is based on nature as you see it, nature in essence. We seek both containment and natural expression.  The overarching factor is garden design: to have the tree or shrub fit the garden design and still honor the natural form. Our approach works on fruit trees, too, but it’s different from pruning skyline trees, like redwoods and oaks.

“Unlike most animals, plants and trees have the ability to regenerate lost parts. Follow-up pruning requires consistency and has the potential to give the tree longer life. In order for pruning to be structurally sound, it needs to be continually applied—you can’t just do it once.” Some bonsai trees in Japan are 500 to 600 years old. Because these trees outlive human beings, their care has been handed down from generation to generation. For Alliger, “It’s all about love and all about care.

“While the school of thought comes from Japanese pruning, we are not pruning Japanese gardens—we are pruning California gardens, American gardens. But the principles are universally applied,” said Alliger, who is exploring working with native materials to find their potential. The idea of containment and structural pruning has not happened before with our native woody plants.

“I’m experimenting at home with buckeye—how old do they have to be before they flower? How small can they be and still flower? It’s so exciting to think about! The Japanese have been working with landscape plant material in their gardens for 1,100 years. Here, we’ve been doing it for only 75 years, and we’re in the baby stage of realizing the possibilities and finding out which ones are going to be functional in gardens from the point of view of beauty and containment. The more we use our own plant material, the more comfortable we feel. That sense of context is salubrious.”

A powerful part of Alliger’s exploration is in joining the stream of people who have been doing this work for centuries; now he is able to pass it forward. After moving to Sebastopol in 1992, he took on the aesthetic pruning of the Japanese-style gardens at Osmosis Day Spa Sanctuary in Freestone. While he continues to maintain those trees, most of his work is done in private gardens around Sonoma County. Retiring from teaching at Merritt in 2011, he currently offers an annual one-day, hands-on class in Aesthetic Pruning for the Master Gardeners of Marin County. He also writes a garden blog for the Osmosis Newsletter which you can sign up for here.

The following link has a brief video demonstrating “Aesthetic Pruning of Maples” on YouTube. A more extensive tutorial on that subject is available for purchase from GardenTribe.com.
You can contact Michael Alliger by email at twigchaser@earthlink.net. Learn more about the APA by visiting their website AestheticPrunersAssociation.org.