Posts Tagged ‘kyoto-style garden sonoma county’

Horticultural Garden Tour

horticultural garden tour at osmosis

A 1.5 hour-long guided tour of the Osmosis Kyoto-style Meditation garden will be conducted by Osmosis founder Michael Stusser and tree pruning expert Michael Alliger. This garden makes extensive use of stone, water and deer resistant plants to express the tranquil feeling of a Japanese style design.

Visitors will be treated to an in-depth look at the underlying Zen themes built into the rock arrangements and pond layout, as well as information about the planting themes and plant materials. The garden has been built over a period of many years and was designed by the preeminent landscape designer, Robert Ketchell, of Britain.

Tour followed by Cedar Enzyme Footbaths, tea and snacks.

Admission: $25. Book a service for that day and get $20 off any service. Space is limited to 14, make your reservations in advance.

The Art of Watering

By Michael Alliger, Master Pruner

Summer’s here in Sonoma County California and the rains have stopped.  This means it’s time to water.  Since water is increasingly precious it’s important to use it to best effect.  My pruning mentor Dennis Makishima enlivened in me the love of growing trees in containers and it was he who said, “Watering is an art”.  Those words changed me forever, remaking what might have been a mindless routine into a conscious relational act bordering on spiritual.  As I came to understand it watering is a complex, intriguing aspect of plant care.

Over-Watering

Effective watering depends on a plant’s needs, soil composition, sun and wind exposure, and temperature.  A recurring concern is how much water and how often.  Over-watering is especially problematic since we generally don’t see the effects until it’s too late with no remedy short of re-potting.  To avoid this dilemma we learn from bonsai artists to use soil mix that is virtually without organic matter consisting only of drainage material.  Most bagged potting mixes have high levels of humus, compost, etc. which retain water in such varying and unknown quantities that accurate assessment of soil moisture is difficult.  Using the high drainage formula allows excess water to drain immediately.  While eliminating the fear of over-watering this mix also means we must guard against drying out.  So a regular seasonal schedule of watering is required.  To help gauge soil moisture an inexpensive hydrometer may be available at local hardware stores or nurseries.  In the absence of a hydrometer, a quick check of water retention can be done by lifting the container (when possible) to judge weight.  A light container likely means it’s time to water.  A plant that has seriously dried out can be dunked in a bucket of water; holding the soil level below water will elicit bubbles as air spaces are filled with water.  Remove the container and water runs out to proper level. Another aspect of humus-free mix is that fertilizing is up to us.  Proper fertilizing is an art unto itself and too lengthy a discussion for the current effort.  Stay tuned.

Hose-end hand watering is best with a gently showering nozzle.  This implement avoids splash-out of soil while freshening foliage without damage.

sprayer

In-Ground Plants

Most considerations for watering containers are applicable to watering in-ground plants.  While clearly we are not responsible for overall soil conditions in our garden (e.g. loamy, clayey, sandy) amending that soil is critical.  Adding humus-y composted material is almost always a good idea.  It adds nutrients, aerates, and paradoxically improves both drainage and water retention.  Hand-watering (holding a hose in hand) is generally ineffective for getting water to the roots of all but the slightest of bedding plants.  For trees and shrubs a simple inexpensive sprinkler does the job nicely, especially when combined with a calendar and a standard household timer.  For most trees, it’s best to water infrequently and deeply:  every 3 to 4 weeks; 45 minutes; shrubs 20-30 minutes.  Native plants may require less water, but please remember that drought “tolerant” plants may actually do somewhat better with slightly more water.  Careful experimentation is the key.  Established trees and shrubs should be watered out to the drip line (foliage circumference) as this is where the feeder roots grow.  Watering at the trunk is largely ineffective.  Newly planted specimens should be watered so as to encourage roots to spread out.

Drip Irrigation

Regarding drip irrigation, there are pros and cons with both containers and in-ground gardens.  On the plus side, drip allows us to water without being present and it can be automated.  It helps sustain life, especially with initial planting.  On the other hand, while seemingly carefree drip irrigation requires regular attention.  We must examine emitters for location and potential clogging due to soil and bugs.  Tubing should be checked for leaks, disconnects and kinks.  Also, dissemination of water is limited by emitters (narrow gravity-driven trajectory) and sprayers rarely get deep enough.  In addition emitters are rated at gallons per hour and it’s unusual to see a system set for more than 15 to 20 minutes.  This might be ok for bedding plants but has little effect on trees and shrubs.  Just as we water the newly planted  increasingly toward the drip line, drip emitters must be periodically moved outward to accommodate spreading roots.

For me the biggest drawback to drip is that it separates us from actually tending to and interacting with our plants in an essential way.  Hand-watering, when done consciously, affords an opportunity to inspect our trees forinsects, disease and general well-being.  We become familiar with a healthy look and are therefore more aware of changes that indicate stress or threat.  Perhaps the most profound benefit is the intimacy it brings – a chance to say hello to each plant and to bask in the silence of its reply.

Forest Bathing Spa Meditation Retreat

Forest Bathing at Osmosis

Shinrin-yoku is a term that means “taking in the forest atmosphere” or “forest bathing.” It was developed in Japan during the 1980’s and has become a cornerstone of preventive health care and healing in Japanese medicine. Learn more about it HERE.

Forest Therapy combines leisurely walks on gentle paths under forest canopy with guided activities to help you open your senses, hone your intuition and experience the forest as you never have before. In the time span of a few hours, we go deep into a direct experience with nature, quietude and receptivity to the present moment.
Includes a morning spa immersion with Cedar Enzyme Footbath, Hammock Sound Therapy and a Revitalizing 75-minute Massage or Facial. Organic Box Lunch followed by afternoon Forest Bathing experience.

Michael Stusser, founder of Osmosis Day Spa

Michael Stusser brings 40 years of meditation practice and a lifetime of wilderness experience to his forest bathing guiding. He is a certified forest-bathing guide with the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guides and Programs (ANFT). He led a delegation to connect with the origins of the movement in Japan in the fall of 2017 with the organization’s founder Amos Clifford.

Horticultural Garden Tour

Horticultural Garden Tour

SOLD OUT! Please join us for our next garden tour on June 25th!

Join us in a 1.5 hour-long guided tour of the Osmosis Kyoto-style Meditation Garden conducted by Osmosis founder Michael Stusser and tree pruning expert Michael Alliger.

Receive an in-depth look at the underlying Zen themes built into the rock arrangements and pond layout, as well as information about the planting themes and plant materials.

Tour followed by Cedar Enzyme Footbaths, tea and snacks.

Admission: $25. Book a service for that day and get $20 off any service. Space is limited to 14, make your reservations in advance.

Horticultural Garden Tour

Horticultural Garden Tour

Join us in a 1.5 hour-long guided tour of the Osmosis Kyoto-style Meditation Garden conducted by Osmosis founder Michael Stusser and tree pruning expert Michael Alliger.

Receive an in-depth look at the underlying Zen themes built into the rock arrangements and pond layout, as well as information about the planting themes and plant materials.

Tour followed by Cedar Enzyme Footbaths, tea and snacks.

Admission: $25. Book a service for that day and get $20 off any service. Space is limited to 14, make your reservations in advance.